Summary of chapter 13 14 in to kill a mockingbird. To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 14 Summary & Analysis from LitCharts 2019-01-28

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To Kill a Mockingbird

summary of chapter 13 14 in to kill a mockingbird

With his high morals, Atticus will not lower himself to the violent measures used by others, even for his own self-defense. They're still terrified, however, by the mystery of Boo. Atticus seemed to enjoy the story of her adventure of going to the black church but Aunt Alexandria was pissed. Ewell shows himself to be arrogant and crude. The Finch children again find themselves welcomed and even honored among blacks when Reverend Sykes invites them to the balcony, and chairs are vacated in the front row on their behalf.


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Notes on Chapter 13 from To Kill a Mockingbird

summary of chapter 13 14 in to kill a mockingbird

Atticus then told Scout that while Aunt Alexandria was living in the house she was to obey her rules too. As Atticus was treating them so unusual Scout began to cry because she felt like she had lost her father and that Aunt Alexandria was going to control everything about her life even the way Atticus acted towards them. The novel takes begins during the summer. Miss Maudie's description of Boo helps the children understand him as a victim of his upbringing. Jem went to the Kitchen and got a broom. Atticus appears to have found his exchange with the young woman distasteful. When people join together in a mob, they lose a feeling of responsibility for their actions, because they act as a group rather than as separate individuals.

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To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 1 Summary and a Few Comments

summary of chapter 13 14 in to kill a mockingbird

Jem plays Boo, Dill plays Mr. Here we see how the law, which is meant to protect people, can sometimes be harmful if followed too absolutely. Jem feels reassured knowing where his father is, but as they are about to head home, four old cars come into town. Miss Maudie explains that the Radleys are foot-washing Baptists - they believe all pleasure is a sin against God, and stay inside most of the time reading the Bible. Several practicing professionals have cited the influence Atticus had on their decisions to join law school or shaped their ideology during school days and afterward during practice. One time, he comes up with a plan to lure Boo out of the house by challenging Jem to touch the Radley Place. Notably, the issues that the author tackles in the book are quite self-explanatory.

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To Kill a Mockingbird

summary of chapter 13 14 in to kill a mockingbird

Ewell remembers Mayella's injuries as being the same as described by the sheriff. Atticus came to the door way. Chapter 18 -Mayella Ewell testifies by saying that she told Tom Robinson to come inside to fix up a dresser, and then he raped her. Atticus orders the children to go home, but Jem refuses. Scout does, however, see a slight move of the window shutter, as if someone was peeking, but she is not sure that she is not imagining it. The chapter also establishes that Scout is a very intelligent and precocious child who learned how to read through her natural instinct, sitting on Atticus's lap and following along in his book.

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To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 14 Summary & Analysis from LitCharts

summary of chapter 13 14 in to kill a mockingbird

The next day, Jem and Dill hatch a plan to leave a note for Boo in the Radley's window, using a fishing line. Rather, the law must change to accommodate them and protect the children, who should not have to suffer needlessly. She hopes that the three of them can get together as they used to, and enjoy themselves. The draft was completed in 1957 and is set in a timeline 20 years after the time depicted in To Kill a Mockingbird. Scout explains the history of how the town came to be and that the town was somewhat isolated from growth because it was so far away from the river so they were forced to marry their cousins. Then, her father arrived and Tom ran away.

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To Kill a Mockingbird: To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 1 Summary & Analysis

summary of chapter 13 14 in to kill a mockingbird

A shadowy group of men emerges. Dill thinks Boo Radley died and Jem says they stuffed his body up the chimney. Why didn't they come running? Many professionals in the town charge their country clients in farm produce rather than monetary currency. Miss Maudie is the most unbiased and supportive of these three women, though Calpurnia becomes much more sympathetic as time goes by. He is determined to guard the basic human rights of Tom and all others by using his knowledge and experience in law. . Scout insists on coming, and they pick up Dill on the way.

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Notes on Chapter 13 from To Kill a Mockingbird

summary of chapter 13 14 in to kill a mockingbird

Later, Jem tells Scout that Alexandra and Atticus have been arguing about the trial; she nearly accused him of bringing disgrace on the family. The Radleys are also differentiated from the community by their willful isolation from the usual patterns of social interaction, which causes the town to ostracize them and unreasonably turn the mysterious Boo into a scapegoat for any odd and unfortunate circumstances that occur. Clearly, more will soon be revealed. Scout agrees and Atticus reads to her and Jem from the papers. Radley, Boo's father, had only been seen on his daily trip to collect groceries from 11:30am-12pm, and the family worshipped together in their own home on Sundays. GradeSaver, 29 July 2007 Web.

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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee Book Summary

summary of chapter 13 14 in to kill a mockingbird

She also says that most of the rumors about him aren't true. Underwood reveals himself in a nearby window with a gun, pointing out that he had them covered the whole time. The continuing example that Atticus sets for his children is to be kind to everyone, even those who show distaste or hatred, but also to stand up for what you believe in. In this town, the rules of society are clearly set. Atticus treats both the sheriff and Ewell with respect, and carefully asks questions that poke holes in the Ewells' claims. Several days after Dill's appearance, a group of men shows up at Atticus' house-including the sheriff- with news that Tom Robinson is being transferred to another jail.

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To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 13 Summary & Analysis from LitCharts

summary of chapter 13 14 in to kill a mockingbird

It is, however, a much easier thing to write about than racism. In Chapter 15, Atticus's stance at the door of the jail is symbolic of his role throughout the book. Ewell says that he ran to get the sheriff. Maycomb reluctantly has bent the laws for the Ewells, and Mr. Even her aunt's constant pestering is a sign of her care for Scout, which is much better than the ambivalence that Dill experienced. He continues to stumble while telling them 'you must try to behave like the little lady and gentleman that you are. She says that Arthur was a nice boy when she used to know him.

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To Kill a Mockingbird

summary of chapter 13 14 in to kill a mockingbird

Scout and her brother get to learn some crucial lessons about judging others through the character of Boo, the cryptic and solitary neighbor. Dill made up this long elaborate story about how he crossed the country on foot and was tied in chains etc. She tells Scout to stop scratching her head. As he had talked, he had realized the ludicrous request Alexandra had made on him and his children and told them to ignore what he'd said. From a distance, they see Atticus sitting in front of the Maycomb jail, reading a newspaper.

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